Young Journalist Academy

The Young Journalist Academy (YJA) sets up 'newsrooms' in primary schools to encourage young people to engage with news and current affairs. It is delivered by Paradigm Arts. Young Journalist Academy staff visit schools to support pupils and teachers with the four components of the programme: establishing a newsroom, article writing, filmmaking, and radio production.

accessibility

Key Stage 2

Key stage

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English

Subject

EEF Summary

This evaluation is part of a round of funding between the Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) and the Royal Society of Arts to test the impact of different cultural learning strategies in English schools entitled ‘Learning about Culture’. These projects have been independently evaluated by a collaboration between the UCL Institute of Education and the Behavioural Insights Team who have also produced an overarching report to draw together learning from all five trials within the round.

Previous research to improve writing has found that support for interventions that include peer assistance, setting product goals, word processing, inquiry, and study of models. YJA operates within many of these domains but had not yet been formally evaluated. This evaluation aimed to measure the effect of participating in the YJA on pupils’ writing skills and explored its impact on pupils' creativity and writing self-efficacy.

This trial of YJA involved 82 schools and 2,137 pupils. The independent evaluation found that pupils in schools that participated in Young Journalist Academy made, on average, the equivalent of two months’ less progress in writing (the primary outcome) compared to children in the usual practice control group. However, as with any study, there is uncertainty around the result: the possible impact of this programme ranges from four months’ less progress to positive effects of one additional month of progress. This result has a moderate to high security rating: 3 out of 5 on the EEF.

The evaluation found that most teachers thought that YJA had a positive impact on pupils’ engagement with culture and the wider world. Teachers also thought that there was some evidence that changes were taking place for pupils in relation to media engagement and skill development. Case study data indicated that YJA had helped pupils to find purpose in their written work, particularly those described as reluctant writers.

Teachers reported that they found it difficult to integrate YJA into their teaching practice and school curriculum. They also reported finding it difficult to extend the programme beyond the eight days provided by the YJA team. Both points were particularly true in schools where the Senior Leadership Team was less supportive of the intervention, and where teachers had been less engaged during YJA sessions.

The EEF has no plans for a further trial of Young Journalist Academy.

Research Results

Writing

-2
Months' Progress
Evidence Strength

Writing, FSM-eligible pupils

-3
Months' Progress
Evidence Strength

Were the schools in the trial similar to my school?

  • There were 82 schools involved in the trial (41 intervention schools and 41 control schools).
  • Schools were from the following regions: Lincolnshire, Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Rutland, London and Newcastle.
  • 87% of schools had either a good or outstanding Ofsted rating.

Could I implement this in my school?

  • The Young Journalist Academy programme is available for schools and is provided by Paradigm Arts.
  • For this trial, schools received 8 one-day sessions led by YJA staff. In other situations, the programme is flexible. YJA consults and devises a targeted programme of support for schools.
  • For the classroom sessions, YJA provide technical equipment including cameras, audio recording equipment, and microphones as well as material such as worksheets and web resources. YJA also work with school staff to identify any relevant equipment in the school that can be used and adapt the programme as needed.
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External Staff

Delivered by

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Whole Class

Participant group

date_range

1 Year

Intervention length

How much will it cost?

The cost to schools of delivering the programme is very low: £13 per pupil per year, as averaged over three years. The cumulative cost to a school over a three-year period is £1,268. These estimates are based on 25 pupils each year participating in the programme, and a school being able to continue the intervention in the second and third year without needing additional support or equipment.

£

£13

Cost per pupil

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1

No. of Teachers/TAs

today

8 Days

Training time per staff member

Evaluation info

Schools

82

Pupils

2137

Key Stage

Key Stage 2

Start date

May 2017

End date

December 2019

Type of trial

Efficacy Trial

Evaluation Conclusions

  1. Children in schools that participated in YJA made the equivalent of two months’ less progress in writing, as measured by the Writing Assessment Measure (WAM), on average, compared to children in other schools. This is our best estimate of impact which has a moderate to high security rating. However, as with any study, there is uncertainty around the result: the possible impact of this programme ranges from four months’ less progress to positive effects of one additional month of progress.

  2. Among pupils eligible for free school meals (FSM), those in schools that participated in YJA made the equivalent of three months’ less progress in writing, on average, compared to children in other schools. These results have lower security than the overall findings because of the smaller number of pupils in this group.

  3. There is no evidence that YJA had an impact on writing self-efficacy or writing creativity (ideation) as measured by the Writing Self-Efficacy Measure (WSEM).

  4. Findings from the IPE indicated that teachers perceived the programme to have a positive impact on pupils. Of the teachers surveyed, 69% thought that YJA had a positive impact on pupils’ writing. However, some teachers were uncertain about whether YJA improved writing attainment, though these teachers said the programme may have had more of an impact on engaging more reluctant writers and increasing writing confidence.

  5. Among teacher survey respondents, 74% thought that YJA had a positive impact on pupils’ engagement with culture and the wider world, and that there was some evidence that longer lasting changes were taking place for pupils in relation to media engagement and skill development. Some teachers also felt that YJA had a positive impact on pupils’ confidence, and that the programme improved communication skills. That said, some teachers found it difficult to reconcile the amount of time required for YJA with teaching the school curriculum, and found it challenging to further embed the programme outside of the sessions.


  1. Updated: 8th September, 2021

    Printable project summary

    1 MB pdf - EEF-young-journalist-academy.pdf

  2. Updated: 24th May, 2018

    Evaluation Protocol

    812 KB pdf - Young_Journalist_Academy_evaluation_protocol.pdf

  3. Updated: 5th February, 2019

    Evaluation Protocol (amended)

    688 KB pdf - YJA_Evaluation_Protocol_(amended).pdf

  4. Updated: 5th February, 2019

    Statistical Analysis Plan

    363 KB pdf - YJA_SAP.pdf

  5. Updated: 17th April, 2019

    Evaluation Protocol (amended 2)

    788 KB pdf - YJA_Evaluation_Protocol_(amended_2).pdf

  6. Updated: 7th September, 2021

    Young Journalist Academy - Final report

    6 MB pdf - Young_Journalist_Academy_Evaluation_Report_Final.pdf

Full project description

Young Journalist Academy (YJA) sets up 'newsrooms' in primary schools to create interest in journalism and improve pupils’ writing skills. The programme typically targets pupils in Year 5. YJA is delivered by Paradigm Arts, and many of the team are current or former journalists.

YJA staff (or mentors, as they are called) come to schools for two days to ‘build the newsroom’. During this time the pupils are trained and then develop and lead their own newsrooms in their schools. The YJA mentors visit schools for six more days over the school year to support pupils to produce journalistic outputs in various forms. Each visit lasts for a full day. Class teachers assist the YJA mentor during the training days, and support pupils as part of the programme. YJA mentors provide the technical equipment required for these sessions, which includes cameras, audio recording equipment, laptops for editing, and microphones. Content that pupils produce during the school year is sent to the YJA team and they publish it on their website, which receives 20,000 visitors each month.